The Premonstratensian Church and Convent

The church, dedicated to the Painful Virgin, was originally built by the Pauline order. The construction works probably took place sometime between 1740 and 1772. The Pauline order was abolished by Joseph II in 1786, thus their church and convent in Oradea could be occupied by the Premonstratensian order in 1808. The building of the convent was significantly expanded between 1872-1874 and designed in an eclectic style. The Oradea High School and the Royal Academy of Law were also housed in the already expanded building. Although the Premonstratensians did not return to Oradea until 1802 to occupy the former Pauline church and monastery and thus take over the management of the city’s Catholic high school, the order itself has been present in the city’s history for much longer.

The church, dedicated to the Painful Virgin, was originally built by the Pauline order. The construction works probably took place sometime between 1740 and 1772. The Pauline order was abolished by Joseph II in 1786, thus their church and convent in Oradea could be occupied by the Premonstratensian order in 1808. The building of the convent was significantly expanded between 1872-1874 and designed in an eclectic style. The Oradea High School and the Royal Academy of Law were also housed in the already expanded building. Although the Premonstratensians did not return to Oradea until 1802 to occupy the former Pauline church and monastery and thus take over the management of the city’s Catholic high school, the order itself has been present in the city’s history for much longer.

In 1131, during the life of Saint Norbert, the founder of the order, King Stephen I settled the Premonstratensians in Oradea in the so-called Oradea Mountain Convent, which thus became not only the mother monastery of the Premonstratensian order in Hungary, but also the burial place of the founding king. The site of the monastery, which was destroyed in the Middle Ages, was previously assumed on today’s Calvary Hill, but in recent years archeological excavations revealed it more to the East, on the site of the former Saint Stephen’s Hill, increasing the number of unexplored Hungarian royal burial sites. The Flex thermal bath, the largest tourist attraction in the area, is named after Helker Félix, the governor of the Bihor estates of the Premonstratensian order, and its construction was started by the Premonstratensians who owned the area in the 18th century.

In 1131, during the life of Saint Norbert, the founder of the order, King Stephen I settled the Premonstratensians in Oradea in the so-called Oradea Mountain Convent, which thus became not only the mother monastery of the Premonstratensian order in Hungary, but also the burial place of the founding king. The site of the monastery, which was destroyed in the Middle Ages, was previously assumed on today’s Calvary Hill, but in recent years archeological excavations revealed it more to the East, on the site of the former Saint Stephen’s Hill, increasing the number of unexplored Hungarian royal burial sites. The Flex thermal bath, the largest tourist attraction in the area, is named after Helker Félix, the governor of the Bihor estates of the Premonstratensian order, and its construction was started by the Premonstratensians who owned the area in the 18th century.

photo gallery

The Chapel of the Merciful Order
The Saint Ladislaus Church
The Canon’s Corridor
The Saint Anne Ursuline convent chapel
The Premonstratensian Church and Convent
The Church of the Descent of the Holy Spirit